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Film Review: Everything Everywhere All at Once

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Take Stephen Chow's Kung Fu Hustle. Blend in some Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon. Toss in a dash of Wong Kar-wai. Fold in some screwball comedy and a smidgen of nihilism. Toss it all together with society's recent fascination with the idea of a multiverse, and you have Everything Everywhere All at Once - a movie that definitely lives up to it's portentous title. Directed by Dan Kwan and Daniel Schienert, known collectively as Daniels, Everything Everywhere All at Once is the tale of Evelyn, a struggling, dissatisfied wife and mother and owner of a laundromat. Her life didn't go as expected and now she is just going through the motions. Her husband wants a divorce (though she doesn't know that yet), her father is a burden, her daughter and her do not get along, and now she's brought home her girlfriend as an added shock to the system. All the while, she is being audited by the IRS and may end up losing her business - on top of losing her husband and daughter. It&#

My Final Oscar Predictions!!!

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Hello true believers and welcome to that annual thing of things - my Oscar Predictions! This year is as predictable as most years, but the funny thing about this year is that Best Picture is the one up in the air. If you had asked me a month ago - hell, a week ago - I would have said The Power of the Dog was a lock for the win. Most Oscar pundits would have said the same. But then the PGA's surprised everyone and awarded their prize to CODA. Add this to their surprise win at the SAG Awards two weeks back and it's beginning to look like a photo finish coming up. The SAG membership is the largest block of voters in The Academy. The PGA is the only other awards, other than The Oscars, that have a preferential ballot, wherein instead of voting on one choice, you list the films in order of preference. These two things combined make CODA suddenly look like a frontrunner. Technically I believe The Power of the Dog is still the frontrunner, but as voting was closing down (and Academy v

Film Review: The Batman (Matt Reeves, 2022)

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Let's start this off with a declaration. The reason Matt Reeves' The Batman is the best of its genre (and it may well be just that) is because it refuses to act as if it's part of the genre at all, instead going far above and beyond the typical theme park tentpoles swarming theatres these days. The Batman may technically be a comic book and/or superhero movie, but it owes more to films like David Fincher's Se7en or Zodiac , or Polanski's Chinatown , or even the works of William Friedkin or Fritz Lang than it does to and comic book and/or superhero movie that came before. The film, based primarily on the comic book Batman:Year Two, is a dark and brutal film, even by normal DCEU standards, which tend to be darker than their average MCU counterpart. This is a superhero movie, much like Zack Snyder's adaptation of Alan Moore's Watchmen, that deconstructs the genre and pretty much tears it apart. Is Batman, a masked vigilante who works above the law, really th

My Final Oscar Nomination Predictios

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So here we go kids! Another year, another attempt at predicting the Oscars! Below are my predictions for Tuesday morning's Oscar Nomination announcement. It seems to be as predictable as ever (80% or so are locks) but it gets pretty messy in that other 20%. We'll see how well I do. So, without further ado, awaaaay we go! Best Picture So there are pretty much seven locks here, followed by a couple almost locks, followed by about five films vying for that tenth spot. Here are my picks in order of probability, even though the top few can be interchangeable as there is no clear cut frontrunner yet. 1. Belfast 2. The Power of the Dog 3. West Side Story 4. Licorice Pizza 5. Dune 6. Don't Look Up 7. CODA 8. King Richard 9. Drive My Car 10. Nightmare Alley Spoilers: Being the Ricardos, Tick, Tick ...Boom!, House of Gucci, The Tragedy of Macbeth Dark Horse Possibilities: The French Dispatch, The Lost Daughter, Parallel Mothers, Spencer My Impossible Hopeful: Shiva Baby (highly overl

2021: The Best in Cinema

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So, here we are again at the end of a year. The end of another cinematic year. And this means, this critic must put forth their Best of the Year list. So, without further ado, here are my choices for the Best Cinema of 2021. 1) Licorice Pizza:   Paul Thomas Anderson, one of the best directors working today, hands us the most personal and down to Earth film of his career. A pretty spectacular feat considering most of the movie is the real life adventures of a real life child actor turned producer. The maker of such films as  There Will be Blood ,  Boogie Nights , and  Magnolia , gives us the account of a fifteen-year-old child actor and budding entrepreneur and his strange yet beautiful friendship with a twenty-five-year-old woman. Cooper Hoffman, son of the late Philip Seymour Hoffman, and Alana Haim from the sister band Haim, make their film debuts and blow the whole shebang out of the water. Bradley Cooper also has a small scenery chewing cameo that is worthy of an Oscar. This film b

The National Food Day Project

So, every day is a special day. National this day and National that day. And every day has a national food attached to it. National Taco Day. National Cream Puff Day. National Peking Duck Day. You get the idea. With that in mind I have decided to take on a new project for 2022. Every day I will eat whatever the national food is, and I will do videos and photos and other fun stuff to commemorate it. These videos and photos and such will be posted on my Facebook, Instagram, and Tik Tok feeds.  You won't know why, but every day you will watch me eat and talk about food, and you will be entertained. Again, you won't know why, but you will be. From National Taffy Day to National Escargot Day to National Blueberry Cheesecake Day to National Yorkshire Pudding Day to Trail Mix Day to Green Bean Casserole Day to Apple Brown Betty Day to Margarita Day. That last one should be fun. So check out my social medias on each day (links below) and travel with me through The National Food Day Pro

Film Review: Licorice Pizza (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2021)

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Licorice Pizza , the auteur's ninth feature film, is probably Paul Thomas Anderson's most personal film to date, which is weird when one considers the story he is telling here is someone else's story. The story is set in a 1973 Southern California that is probably more idealized than the actual time and place were - but that's part of what makes the film so goddamn good.  Based on the life of former child actor turned movie producer Gary Goetzman, whom Anderson had worked with before going the director route himself, the film is a series of charming vignettes in and around the fringes of Hollywood. Anderson himself had grown up in and around the fringes of Hollywood, but about a decade or so after the setting of this film. That being that, even though the brunt of the scenarios, such as starring in a film with Lucille Ball (played loosely her by Christine Ebersole), or starting a waterbed company and delivering a waterbed to Jon Peter's home (played to the height of